Early Education

St. Louis preschoolChoosing a preschool can affect your child’s introduction to learning, their development and their interaction with kids their own age. Because the technical definition of preschool in the United States is a nursery school that is at least partially state funded, you can also look at nursery schools for a similar education for your child or children, without the state funding. Because not every school offers the same curriculum, teaching style or activities, it is important that you choose the right one for your child. The following information can help you with researching and choosing the best preschool in your area.

Location is an important consideration but not a deal breaker if you can get a better school that is slightly further away. An online search or a local city or neighborhood map can tell you all of the schools in your immediate location. Your best option is to mark down each school you are considering, and then research them. Checking local school districts and policies on whether or not you can attend schools outside of your district is also important. Things to consider include travel time, potential morning traffic, whether you can easily make time to drive to and from the school on a daily basis, and the neighborhood.

 

St. Louis Preschools

Phone Number Attributes Location 
 Word of Life Preschool (Timothy Campus)  314-781-8673  Lutheran  St Louis City
 Word of Life Preschool (St Lucas Campus)  314-351-2628  Lutheran  St Louis City
 Adventure Learning Center  636-394-0600  Private  West County
 Agape Academy  314-725-5262  Abeka  Central County
 A Growing Place Montessori School  314-863-9493  Monessori  Central County
 Apple of Your Eye Learning Center  314-638-1568  Daycare – Preschool  South County
 Apprende School  636-225-0006  Independent  West County
 Busy B’s Preschool  314-773-2133  Preschool  South St. Louis
 Casa Dia Montessori  314-892-4446  Montessori  South County
 Chapel of the Cross  314-741-3737  Lutheran – Early Ed  North County
 Chesterfield Day School  314-469-6622  Montessori  West County
 Children of Promise  314-890-8757  Montessori  St. Louis County
 Childtime Learning Center  636-282-2600  Daycare  Jefferson County
 City Garden Montessori School  314-664-7646  Montessori  St. Louis City
 Clayton Early Childhood Center  314-725-2325  Daycare – Preschool  Clayton
 Community School  314-991-0005  Independent  St Louis County
 Cornerstone Center For Early Learning  314-865-5244  St. Louis City
 Creative Nursery & Preschool  314-221-0230  Nursery & Preschool  South St. Louis
 Downtown Childrens Center  314-621-1131  Independent  Downtown
 Elaine Rossi Academy  314-968-3576  Day Care  West County
 Ethical Society Nursery School  314-991-1353  Nursery School  Central County
 Faith Academy Montessori  314-961-1411  Monessori  Central County
 First Congregational Preschool  314-721-2716  Preschool  South St. Louis
 Forest Park Montessori  314-535-6873  Montessori  St. Louis City
 Goddard School  314-918-1210  Montessori  Central County
 Good Vibes School  314-727-VIBE  Independent  Central County
 GSL Development Center  314-385-0611  Daycare thru K  North County
 Hopemark Preschool  314-832-8115  Preschool  South St. Louis
 Hope Montessori Academy  636-949-0709  Daycare / Preschool  St. Charles
 International School House  314-874-0715  Independent  Central County
 Kidsplay Childcare  636-379-9494  Daycare  St. Charles
 KinderCare  888-525-2780  Daycare  Central County
 Kingshighway Hills Preschool  314-352-Kids  Preschool  South City
 Kirk Day School  314-434-4349   Daycare  West County
 Learning Days Daycare  314-209-0065  Daycare  North County
 Le Petite Academy  877-620-0199  Daycare thru K  Jefferson County
 Little Sunshine Playhouse  314-995-7204  Preschool  University City
 Mary Margaret Daycare  314-752-2965  Preschool  St Louis City
 Montessori Learning Center  314-487-5448  Montessori  South County
 Montessori Child Care Preschool  314-892-5446  Montessori  South County
 Noah’s Ark Daycare  314-487-8507  Daycare thru Preschool  South County
 Our Little Haven  314-533-2229  Pre School  St. Louis City
 Rohan Woods  314-821-6270  Independent  Kirkwood
 Primetime Childcare  314-892-1550  Daycare  South County
 Sacred Heart Villa  314-771-2224  Catholic  The Hill
 Samuel Preschool  314-721-5437  Preschool  Clayton
 Sappington Child Care Center  314-843-4971  Private  South County
 Shirley Green Preschool  314-569-0048  Jewish  Central County
 Simon Says Early Childhood Center  314-842-3848  Early Childhood  South County
 Southside Early Childhood Center  314-865-0322  Preschool  South St. Louis
 St Louis Montessori  314-647-1400  Montessori  St Louis City
 St Lucas United Church of Christ  314-843-1000  Church of Christ  South County
 Stix Early Childhood Center  314-533-0874  STL Public Schools  St. Louis City
 Tower Grove Christian  314-776-6473  Christian  Tower Grove
 Union Preschool  314-647-0898  Methodist  Southwest St. Louis
 University City Children’s Center  314-721-0939  Preschool  University City
 UUM Preschool  314-863-7904  Preschool  St. Louis City
 Villa Di Maria Montessori  314-822-2601  Montessori  Kirkwood
 Village Lutheran Preschool  314-993-6743  Lutheran  St Louis County
 Waldorf School  314-962-2129  Independent  Webster
 Washington Montessori School  314-361-0432  Montessori  St Louis City
 Webster Childcare Center  314-968-3189  Daycare  Webster Groves
 The Westport School  314-878-5339  Daycare  Westport
 Wilkinson Early Childhood Center  314-645-1202  St. Louis Public Schools  St. Louis City

 

What does the term Montessori mean? If you have children, you may have heard the term “Montessori” when it comes to education. The term comes from the name Maria Montessori who created an educational approach based on her extensive research of children who had special needs. Although Montessori’s work began at the turn of the 20thcentury, it is embraced today by many educational institutions.

Tips On Selecting the Right St. Louis Preschool

Rating and Reviews: Checking ratings and reviews on the web can help you with choosing a preschool that offers the best care and quality facilities. Because you can easily see what other people think about the preschool with a quick search, you don’t have to worry about not knowing what the school is like. A quick search can usually bring up the schools website and possibly social media as well, where you can read about policies, school information and potentially reviews and comments. Because all of this information can help you with creating an informed decision, it is definitely worth your time to look up.

Recommendations: If you know other parents with children who are the same age or older than yours, asking for recommendations is an easy way to get a good idea of which schools are worth considering. Most parents have a good idea of why they chose the school their children are attending as well, which means you can get advice, as well as opinions on the school from the parent.

Activities: A list of daily activities and options is important if you want to see what your child is spending days doing. While some preschools offer this information on their website, you can usually drop by to request a brochure or a tour without any hassle. This allows you to get a first hand look at what kids are doing, as well as a list of daily activities, lessons and offerings. If you want a tour, you should call in advance to arrange it, which allows you to see the facilities, children at play and how teachers and assistants interact with the students.

Teaching Methods: If you want your children to learn something specific or in a specific way, then choosing the right preschool is important. Options range from standard State based curriculum to Montessori or free choice education rooms, where kids can choose their own activities and lessons. One consideration is that different learning methods allow different types of freedom and person development, while others focus on teaching skills such as memorization and basic curriculum, which is immediately useful in kindergarten. Most preschools concentrate on allowing children to develop individualism and life skills such as interacting with others and verbally talking out arguments. Because social interaction is an important part of development for preschool children, a school that allows plenty of time for free play or learning in a social environment is a good idea.

Affiliations: Affiliations matter if you want your child to attend a specific type of Preschool. For example, you can find a Catholic preschool or a Jewish one if you want an option with specific religion based curriculum or activities. At the preschool level, Christian schools involve some bible reading, and bible based toys, coloring books and information.  You can also look for a preschool that is completely unaffiliated if you want.

Choosing the right preschool is important because it affects a great deal of your child’s social and learning development. Because there are multiple options available in most areas, you can do your research to choose a preschool that best fits you and your child. Because learning methods vary, you can also choose the school based on their curriculum and what school you intend to send them to next.

 

What is the Montessori Method?

The emphasis of the method itself is based on providing independence, engaging in freedom with certain limitations, and respecting the child’s physical, social, and psychological development. Although there are a number of practices that work under the Montessori Method, all of them have certain characteristics in common.

–       Constructive model of education as opposed to direction oriented from the teacher

–       Children ranging in age from 2 ½ up to 6 years old

–       A three hour minimum block time for work

–       Student choice in types of activities

–       Can move around the classroom

–       Use of specialized educational materials

All of these paths combine into the Montessori Method which is used around the world for the education of children. The activities are led by a teacher trained in this particular method.

History of Montessori Education

Maria Montessori began developing the concept for her method of teaching back in 1897. She attended the University of Rome and attended courses in pedagogy while reading on teaching theories for children that went back over two centuries. Over the next decade, Maria began developing theories about the proper teaching of children based on observation as well as experimentation.

By 1907, Maria had opened up her first classroom called the Children’s House located in a tenement building in Rome. Her work was noticed by Alice and Leopold Franchetti of Citta di Castello because it matched much of the work that they were doing. It was this collaboration that led to Maria and the Franchetti’s to publishing the system called, “Method Franchetti-Montessori”. The book was a popular one for years until the fascists that took over Italy had it removed from the shelves because Alice Franchetti was Jewish.

By 1911, the Montessori method spread to the US and it became very popular. However, a book critical of the Montessori Method was published by William Heard Kilpatrick in 1914 titled, “The Montessori System Examined” and the result was that the method Montessori developed virtually disappeared until 1960. At that time, a renewed interest in the system was such that it spread across the US with thousands of schools adopting the various methods that were taught.

Maria Montessori never stopped extending her work on developing the method that would reach from birth up to 24 years old using the established psychological models of development. Maria would write and lecture about the various models for learning that applied to different age groups of children, but she would not see most of the incorporated into school systems during her lifetime.

The Montessori Method is one that is based on the model for human development and teaching within its parameters. The belief is that children who are given the choice to act within that environment will develop educationally at the most optimal rate.